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International Development

International Development

FSI researchers consider international development from a variety of angles. They analyze ideas such as how public action and good governance are cornerstones of economic prosperity in Mexico and how investments in high school education will improve China’s economy.

They are looking at novel technological interventions to improve rural livelihoods, like the development implications of solar power-generated crop growing in Northern Benin.

FSI academics also assess which political processes yield better access to public services, particularly in developing countries. With a focus on health care, researchers have studied the political incentives to embrace UNICEF’s child survival efforts and how a well-run anti-alcohol policy in Russia affected mortality rates.

FSI’s work on international development also includes training the next generation of leaders through pre- and post-doctoral fellowships as well as the Draper Hills Summer Fellows Program.

Recent Projects

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PRICE Manual of Procedures

Chinese children have among the highest rates of myopia in the world.
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Training for the Future

Evaluating National Teacher Training Programs in Rural China Problem China's rural students lag far behind their urban counterparts in academic achievement.  If rural students lack necessary...
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Increasing High School Matriculation

China has shown incredible progress in the last several decades in expanding access to education.
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Teacher Performance Pay

Designs for Teacher Incentives: A Search for the Best Teacher Performance Pay System in Rural China Problem Students in rural schools in China are falling behind.
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Guaranteed Financial Aid for College

Problem When all expenses are added up, university costs in China can reach 10,000 to 12,000 yuan per year.
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Keeping Kids in School

In China's developed urban areas, up to 80 percent of students are accepted into universities.
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Technology and Human Capital _ Migration

One often hears that China has the largest online population in the world.
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Nutrition, Health and Education _ Migration

Check out our latest work on:     > Baby Nutrition        > Uncorrected Vision         > Intestinal Worms        > Text Messaging for Health Health & Education: What's the Link...
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Seeing is Learning - Access to Vision Care: Rural vs. Urban

Eyeglass ownership among migrant children is as low as it is with rural children REAP’s research on uncorrected vision in both rural and urban settings reveal a high percentage of China’s rural and...
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Impact of Wearing Glasses on Student Test Scores

Researchers and practitioners have long sought to establish the relationship between vision care and educational performance.
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Policy Related Research - REAP 2013

Official Policy Briefs(Submitted to China’s State Council) Research and Policy Recommendations on the Situation of Infant Malnutrition and Underdevelopment in Poor AreasAdvisory for Implementing a...
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School Counseling and Junior High Dropout

One out of four students drop out before graduating from junior high. Part of the problem is that students feel like the school does not care about them and lack a sense of belonging.
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Intestinal Worms

Poor sanitation breeds trouble. Intestinal worms are a significant public health problem in many developing countries, with about one quarter of the world’s population infected.
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Guaranteed Financial Aid for High School

Is low attendance affected by lack of knowledge about financial aid?
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Documenting China's Digital Divide

China faces an emerging technology divide: while some groups have gained much access to technology, others lag behind.
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Paying for Performance

There is a strong relationship between poor health and the achievement gap. Gaping rural-urban inequality is a major challenge facing the rapidly developing Chinese society today.
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Baby Malnutrition and Developmental Delays in Rural China

Left behind by the rapid growth of the Chinese economy in large cities, Stanford researchers find that the average baby in rural China is malnourished and developmentally dealyed.
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One Laptop Per Child

Is a One-Laptop-Per-Child (OLPC) program an effective way to narrow the digital and educational divides in China?
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Computer Assisted Learning in Poor Rural Schools

   Having demonstrated CAL's effectiveness in raising academic performance in poor rural schools, REAP hopes to further integrate the program into the curriculum of all rural schools.  Despite the...
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Text Messaging for Health

The success of multivitamin supplement programs often requires participation from families.
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Best Buy Toolkit for Health

Migrant children in a suburb outside Beijing Over the years, the Rural Education Action Project (REAP) has shown that young children at elementary schools across poor parts of rural China suffer...
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"Across the Pacific" Curriculum Project

Student-aged children in the United States have a poor understanding of China's history, development, and current affairs.
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Counseling, Vouchers, and High School Matriculation

China's national government still struggles to keep students in school through high school Compulsory education in China ends with grade 9.
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Vocational vs. Academic High School

China is the world’s largest developing country.
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People

Prashant Loyalka Center Fellow
Grant Miller Senior Fellow Associate Professor, Medicine (CHP/PCOR)
Di Mo Postdoc Fellow
Tao Li Affiliate
Yingquan Song Affiliate
Xiaobing Wang Research Associate, REAP-China
Xiaochen Ma Lecturer
Linxiu Zhang Director, REAP-China
Johan Swinnen Affiliate
Xiaopeng Pang Affiliate
Xinxin Chen Affiliate
Chengfang Liu Program Manager, REAP-China