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Health and Medicine

Health and Medicine

FSI’s researchers assess health and medicine through the lenses of economics, nutrition and politics. They’re studying and influencing public health policies of local and national governments and the roles that corporations and nongovernmental organizations play in providing health care around the world. Scholars look at how governance affects citizens’ health, how children’s health care access affects the aging process and how to improve children’s health in Guatemala and rural China. They want to know what it will take for people to cook more safely and breathe more easily in developing countries.

FSI professors investigate how lifestyles affect health. What good does gardening do for older Americans? What are the benefits of eating organic food or growing genetically modified rice in China? They study cost-effectiveness by examining programs like those aimed at preventing the spread of tuberculosis in Russian prisons. Policies that impact obesity and undernutrition are examined; as are the public health implications of limiting salt in processed foods and the role of smoking among men who work in Chinese factories. FSI health research looks at sweeping domestic policies like the Affordable Care Act and the role of foreign aid in affecting the price of HIV drugs in Africa.

Recent Projects

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Poor Parenting and Developmental Delays in Rural China

Stanford researchers find that the vast majority of parents in rural China don’t talk to, or interact with their young children, hindering development of vocabulary and language skills.
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The Role of Teachers in Visual Acuity Screening

To deliver quality vision care to rural students, we trained teachers to conduct vision screenings in their schools.
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Building a Blueprint for Change

Our research has shown that the vision care system in rural China needs radical revision.
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Nutrition, Health and Education _ Migration

Check out our latest work on:     > Baby Nutrition        > Uncorrected Vision         > Intestinal Worms        > Text Messaging for Health Health & Education: What's the Link...
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Seeing is Learning - Access to Vision Care: Rural vs. Urban

Eyeglass ownership among migrant children is as low as it is with rural children REAP’s research on uncorrected vision in both rural and urban settings reveal a high percentage of China’s rural and...
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Policy Related Research - REAP 2013

Official Policy Briefs(Submitted to China’s State Council) Research and Policy Recommendations on the Situation of Infant Malnutrition and Underdevelopment in Poor AreasAdvisory for Implementing a...
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Intestinal Worms

Poor sanitation breeds trouble. Intestinal worms are a significant public health problem in many developing countries, with about one quarter of the world’s population infected.
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Paying for Performance

There is a strong relationship between poor health and the achievement gap. Gaping rural-urban inequality is a major challenge facing the rapidly developing Chinese society today.
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Baby Malnutrition and Developmental Delays in Rural China

Left behind by the rapid growth of the Chinese economy in large cities, Stanford researchers find that the average baby in rural China is malnourished and developmentally dealyed.
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Text Messaging for Health

The success of multivitamin supplement programs often requires participation from families.
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Best Buy Toolkit for Health

Migrant children in a suburb outside Beijing Over the years, the Rural Education Action Project (REAP) has shown that young children at elementary schools across poor parts of rural China suffer...
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One Egg a Day

The government is able to provide an egg for each of these students, but is that enough?
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Chewable Vitamins

Vitamins are accessible and affordable in China Severe iron deficiency (anemia) is known to dramatically slow cognitive, behavioral, and physical development and has been identified as one of the...
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Seeing is Learning

International studies put the economic cost of uncorrected vision at billions of dollars per year worldwide. What is the cost to China’s children?
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Is One Egg Enough?

Eggs alone, although nutritious, may not curb anemia. During the 2008/09 school year, REAP conducted their first study of anemia, its causes and its consequences in Shaanxi Province.
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Worm Count 2010

Poor health habits are prevalent in crowded dining commons. Intestinal worms are a widespread problem in many developing countries.
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Paying for Performance in the Battle Against Anemia: Pilot Study

ProblemDespite China’s rapid economic development, prevalence rates of iron deficiency anemia among children in China’s poorest rural areas range between 25% and 60% - implying more than 10 million...
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Dorm Managers in Rural Primary Schools

Problem One of the major challenges facing policymakers who are in charge of education in China today is how to provide quality, safe and nurturing boarding school services to the more than 10...
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People

Grant Miller Senior Fellow Associate Professor, Medicine (CHP/PCOR)
Scott Rozelle Senior Fellow
Hongmei Yi Program Manager, REAP-China
Huan Zhou Affiliate
D. Scott Smith Affiliated Faculty
Linxiu Zhang Director, REAP-China
Kaleigh Kenny Kaleigh Kenny Project Manager for REAP Project Manager for REAP
Alexis Medina REAP Project Manager for Health & Nutrition